Sunday, December 30, 2018

Will the Guv become the next UC Regent?

Could he appointment himself on the way out? Or, could the new Guv appoint him?
This morning's interview, once again he expressed he has concerns that line up with areas of ongoing UC research:



See, as mentioned here before, there's a vacancy- even check out:

"To be appointed by Gov. Brown or future Gov. Newsom:
VACANCY"



________
While we're at it...
- yes there is a slot open and that page goes on to list the others BUT, just like the regents site, the lists do not explain the reason, origins of the abbreviated (shorter than) 12 yr terms for some of the regents- which the regents should explain clearly but don't. For example, Lieb's term expires 2026 because he is taking a term that was an appointment from 2014 and the current vacancy, one can deduce, is also an appointment from 2014 (both Lozano and Pattiz were reappointed in that year along with Blum- but both Lozano and Blum have left the board before their terms expired, they are not listed as regents emeriti btw).


"Current members

Originally appointed by Gov. Gray Davis:

Sherry L. Lansing (appointed 1999; reappointed 2010; term expires March 1, 2022)[11]

Richard C. Blum (appointed 2002; reappointed in 2014 by Jerry Brown, reappointment confirmed on Aug. 22, 2014, term expires March 1, 2026)[12]

Originally appointed by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger:

Hadi Makarechian (appointed 2008; term expires March 1, 2020)

Charlene Zettel (appointed 2009; term expires March 1, 2021)

George David Kieffer (Chairman) (appointed 2009; term expires March 1, 2021)

Originally appointed by Gov. Jerry Brown:

Richard Sherman (appointed 2014, appointment confirmed on Aug. 22, 2014; term expires March 1, 2025)[12]

Eloy Ortiz Oakley (appointed 2014; term expires March 1, 2024)

John Pérez (Vice Chair) (appointed 2014; term expires March 1, 2024)

Gareth Elliott (appointed 2015; 2025 term expires March 1, 2025)

Ellen Tauscher (appointed 2017; term expires 2028)

Howard "Peter" Guber (appointed 2017; term expires 2029)

Lark Park (appointed 2017; term expires 2029)

Maria Anguiano (appointed 2017; term expires 2028)

Laphonza Butler (appointed 2018; term expires 2030)

Michael Cohen (appointed 2018; term expires 2030)

Cecilia Estolano (appointed 2018; term expires 2022)

Richard Leib (appointed 2018; term expires 2026)


...
Student Regent:

Devon Graves (term expires June 30, 2019) ..."

_______

Anyway,
It would be his opportunity to counter some of the UC narrative on him or correct the record on committee of two, other things etc

Just recently:

https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/article/Student-leaders-say-they-ll-fight-UC-regents-13496536.php

"Outgoing Gov. Jerry Brown “was a hard ‘no’” on that, said Caroline Siegel-Singh, a junior at UC San Diego and president of the statewide UC Student Association."...

http://uclafacultyassociation.blogspot.com/2018/12/advise-but-not-consent.html


-- earlier:
https://cloudminder.blogspot.com/2018/12/uc-path-bookends-it.html


https://cloudminder.blogspot.com/2018/12/uc-regents-2019-and-questions-around-uc.html



Friday, December 28, 2018

UC Regents 2019 - And-Questions Around UC Regent Emeritus Status

See:

https://regents.universityofcalifornia.edu/about/regents%20emeriti.html

There are a number of UC Regents who have left the board during the same time period as some of the other former regents now listed on that page.

Here's who is listed:

Regents Emeriti

De La Peña, William M.D. Appointed August 18, 2006 to a term expiring March 1, 2018 (by Schwarzenegger)
Lemus, J. Alberto Alumni Regent, July 1, 2017 - June 30, 2018, and Vice Chair, Alumni Associations of the University of California
Mancia, Francesco Alumni Regent, July 1, 2017- June 30, 2018 and President, Alumni Associations of the University of California
Monge, Paul Student Regent, July 1, 2017- June 30, 2018
Ramirez, Marcela Student Regent, July 1, 2016- June 30, 2017
Reiss, Bonnie Appointed March 27, 2008 to a term expiring March 1, 2020 (by Schwarzenegger)
Varner, Bruce D. Appointed August 18, 2006 to a term expiring March 1, 2018 (by Schwarzenegger)


One might justifiably ask what is the purpose of that web page? ; Why isn't the status of UC Regent Emeriti explained along with explanation of blatant omissions?; Are omissions a means of punishing former board members not listed? What benefits come along with UC Regents Emeriti status, if any? No explanation of that page on that page...And yet UC Regents have put this effort into creating it.
(E. Island was in the same regent cohort as Reiss de la Pena, and Island completed his full term as well etc.. then there's Pattiz and Lozano who left the board during in the same time frame of those who are listed as Emeriti etc)

______________________


While we're at it
Once again listed here *because the regents do not provide a one stop page listing this information on Committee Assignments and they only piecemeal list this information on the bio page for each regent in the side bar* here are the current UC Regents committee assignments that extend into the New Year 2019:

Here are the current committee assignments-- note disparities as you may:


Anguiano
Committee Membership (2018-2019)

-Finance and Capital Strategies
-Compliance and Audit (Vice Chair)
-Investments (Vice Chair)

____

Blum
Committee Membership (2018-2019)

-Finance and Capital Strategies
-Governance and Compensation
-Health Services
-Public Engagement

____

Butler
Committee Membership (2018-2019)

-Academic and Student Affairs
-Public Engagement and Development

____

Cohen
Committee Membership (2018-2019)

-Finance and Capital Strategies
-Compliance and Audit

__

Elliott
Committee Membership (2018-2019)

-Academic and Student Affairs
-Compliance and Audit (Chair)
-Governance and Compensation

____

Estolano
Committee Membership (2018-2019)

-Academic and Student Affairs
-Compliance and Audit
-National Laboratories

____


Graves
Committee Membership (2018-2019)

-Academic and Student Affairs
-Public Engagement and Development (Vice Chair)

____

Guber
Committee Membership (2018-2019)

-Public Engagement and Development

____

Kieffer
Committee Membership (2018-2019)

As Chair of the Board, Regent Kieffer is ex officio member of all committees except the National Laboratories Subcommittee and Investments Subcommittee.

____

Lansing
Committee Membership (2018-2019)

-Academic and Student Affairs
-Governance and Compensation
-Health Services (Chair)
-Public Engagement and Development

____

Leib
Committee Membership (2018-2019)

-Finance and Capital Strategies
-Public Engagement and Development
-Investments

____

Makarechian
Committee Membership (2018-2019)

-Compliance and Audit
-Finance and Capital Strategies (Chair)
-Governance and Compensation
-Health Services
-Investments (ex officio)

____

Ortiz Oakley
Committee Membership (2018-2019)

-Academic and Student Affairs
-Governance and Compensation (Vice Chair)
-National Laboratories
-Public Engagement and Development (Chair)

____

Park
Committee Membership (2018-2019)

-Finance and Capital Strategies (Vice Chair)
-Compliance and Audit
-Investments

____

Pérez
Committee Membership (2018-2019)

-Academic and Student Affairs (Chair)
-Compliance and Audit
-Governance and Compensation

____

Sherman
Committee Membership (2018-2019)

-Finance and Capital Strategies
-Governance and Compensation (Chair)
-Health Services (Vice Chair)
-Investments (Chair)
-Public Engagement and Development

____

Tauscher
Committee Membership (2018-2019)

-Academic and Student Affairs (Vice Chair)
-Compliance and Audit
-National Laboratories (Chair)

____

Zettel
Committee Membership (2018-2019)

-Academic and Student Affairs
-Compliance & Audit
-Governance and Compensation
-Health Services
-National Laboratories (Vice Chair)

____

Anderson
Committee Membership (2018-2019)

-Finance and Capital Strategies
-Investments
-Public Engagement and Development

____

Morimoto
Committee Membership (2018-2019)

-Academic and Student Affairs
-Compliance and Audit
-National Laboratories

____________________________

And here are the scheduled meetings-

Note 1: that the Health Committee meetings are held at UCLA (long term committee chair regent Lansing based in LA) but that info is not included, listed on the schedule for some reason.

Note 2: that the Investments Committee, which also meets off cycle from full board Regents meetings, is not included in the regents calendar of meetings listing for some unknown reason, why not? The Investments Committee meetings are held at UCLA because the chair of that committee, Sherman, is located there.

Note 3: also that the regents over the last decade have attempted to institute a habit of each year holding one special meeting at a campus other than at UCSF ( a medical complex that does not include undergraduates etc) -- the thinking was UC Berkeley or UCLA are perceived as campuses that already dominate discussion, the thinking was to at least have one meeting at UCD or UCSC or UCM or UCR or UCI or UCSB or UCSD - so that the campus could see the full board regents and vice versa- as well as the benefit of the full board presence to highlight these campuses -- that was some of the expressed thinking then-- now, this coming year 2019 the regents opted once again to hold that special meeting at UCLA- just as they did last year- UC Regents chair Kieffer is based in LA...

Note 4: also that the full board UC Regents almost always extend over a three day period and the first day is frequently not included on the listed schedule and only pops up as listed ten days before the UC Regents meeting because the regents are required to provide that info ten days prior to their meetings at the very latest-- so keep that in mind as you view this:

In
2019:

https://regents.universityofcalifornia.edu/meetings/

January 16-17 - Regents Meeting (UCSF Mission Bay)

February 11 - Health Services Committee (UCLA)

March 13-14 - Regents Meeting (UCLA)

April 9 - Health Services Committee (UCLA)

May 15-16 - Regents Meeting (UCSF Mission Bay)

June 11 - Health Services Committee (UCLA)

July 17-18 - Regents Meeting (UCSF Mission Bay)

August 13 - Health Services Committee (UCLA)

September 18-19 - Regents Meeting (UCLA)

October 10 - Health Services Committee (UCLA)

November 13-14 - Regents Meeting (UCSF Mission Bay)

December 10 - Health Services Committee (UCLA)

Tuesday, December 25, 2018

Some big topics

See:

The Mercury News gives a good overview of the issue and an update on a new deadline for negotiation:
University of California leads fight over access to research
https://www.mercurynews.com/2018/12/25/university-of-california-leads-fight-over-access-to-research/


____

San Francisco Chronicle - a sports reporter offers this coverage::
"Cal chancellor Carol Christ looks to unify academia and sports in 2019"
https://www.sfchronicle.com/collegesports/article/Cal-chancellor-Carol-Christ-looks-to-unify-13488046.php


___
Update, here's more:

Interesting good long read- this Bakke vs Brown ; affirmative action vs reparations; preferring lit reading rather than joining in on fixing insurmountable problems etc.:

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2018/12/affirmative-action-about-reparations-not-diversity/578005/

__

And for other reads,see:
The series of tweets about the management of resort type services and other serious questions , experiences of natl parks located in CA and otherwise --here:
http://utotherescue.blogspot.com

__

A post about long term litigation battle by UC natl labs employees who want to protect their retirement benefits: here.
https://uclafacultyassociation.blogspot.com/2018/12/the-livermore-case-on-retiree-health.html

They don't mention that here:https://www.glassdoor.com/Award/Best-Places-to-Work-LST_KQ0,19.htm

Funny enough, the Bain of UC Berkeley's OpEx existence is listed as number one there...has the consultant class and management put their fingers on the glass doors scales ranking??

To herald it here?: https://www.llnl.gov/news/lawrence-livermore-among-glassdoor’s-‘best-places-work’-ranked-top-lab-employer

And other things:
https://uclafacultyassociation.blogspot.com/

Monday, December 24, 2018

UC PATH bookends it

See:
"California legislators demand that UC address payroll system malfunctions"
http://www.dailycal.org/2018/12/23/ca-legislators-demand-that-uc-addresses-payroll-system-malfunctions/

..."After UC employees reported hundreds of malfunctions with recently implemented payroll system UCPath, Assemblymember Lorena Gonzalez, D-San Diego, and state Sen. Nancy Skinner, D-Berkeley, voiced their concerns in letters to UC chancellors, demanding that the issue be addressed.

UCPath, which has been implemented UC Santa Barbara, UC Riverside, UC Merced and UCLA, was created to unify the UC payroll system, according to the UCPath project website. Since the system’s implementation, hundreds of UC employees, including undergraduate and graduate students, have reported miscalculated or missing paychecks. Gonzalez said in her letter that student workers are especially affected by the malfunctions."..
____


"
Daily Californian
'Students should have a voice': UC Board of Regents to terminate student adviser position
http://www.dailycal.org/2018/12/23/uc-board-of-regents-to-consider-terminating-student-advisor-position/


..."UC Board of Regents intends to eliminate the student adviser role, a position that provides the board with student input on university issues including sexual assault policy, tuition and basic needs, at its next meeting in January.

The student adviser position was established in January 2016 as a two-year pilot program "..."Huang added that if the board follows through on Regent Richard Sherman’s recommendation to remove the student adviser position at the end of Huang’s term, there will be no undergraduate representation on the board for the 2019-2020 term, given that Student Regent Devon Graves and Student Regent-designate Hayley Weddle, who will assume the role of student regent at the end of Graves’ term, are both graduate students"
....

- some brief background etc: chair of the regents Kieffer has, for years, been opposed to any expansion of students Regents slots e.g. one slot for under grad, grad, post doc professuonal, Sherman is just advancing the interest in shrinking the voices on the board it seems.
Now former but then-student regent Oved ( who now is on the advisory board for this UC effort) at that time advanced the compromise when it became clear they would refuse more student regent slots expansion : the compromise was the creation of the pilot student adviser position (based on another pilot program that became permanent: the staff adviser position). The regents don't display a significant interaction with staff adviser during meetings and the advisers have sometimes been very meek in the open proceedings of board meetings, even on agenda items directly impacting staff. True to form, the regents don't display, show any real interactions with those types of positions- e.g. they don't even bother to ask the head UCSA student leader any questions at all when UCSA make a speech as part of the formal proceedings of the UC regents full board meetings, for years and years they have not engaged in any q and a after those presentations from UCSA, unless it is the sole question of whether or not UCSA will join UC lobbying efforts for more funding. The interactions the regents respect are with fellow regent voting members. So, it is now right back to the same point --there needs to be a student regent position for each level of student: one for undergraduate population, one for graduate population, one for professional level, period.

____
"Update: UC attempts to delay bargaining"
http://academicresearchersunited.org/2018/12/14/update-uc-attempts-to-delay-bargaining/

..."Dear Colleague,

We’re writing to share some important updates about forming our union, Academic Researchers United.

UC administration files objections to forming our union
In mid-November, California’s Public Employment Relations Board (PERB) announced that a majority of Academic Researchers signed authorization cards in support of forming a union, Academic Researchers United / UAW. This paves the way for us to become the largest ever group of Academic Researchers in the US to form their own union. However, last week UC administration chose to deny recognition of our union, saying that “The University reasonably doubts the appropriateness of the proposed unit.”

We find UC’s position unacceptable. Majorities of Academic Researchers in every job title support forming a union and are currently participating in preparation for bargaining. Project Scientists, Specialists, Researchers, and CPPs all perform research or research-adjacent work, have fixed length appointments, share identical benefits, and have a similar promotion process – which is more than enough to constitute an appropriate unit. In fact, PERB—the State agency with the authority to make such decisions— has previously ruled that these employees are part of an appropriate unit. Rather than recognizing our union and meeting us at the bargaining table, UC administration has chosen instead to spend enormous amounts of time and money attempting to divide us and delay bargaining.

What happens now?
Thankfully, UC administration cannot unilaterally decide whether or not ARs have a union nor what the composition of our union is. We are hoping to meet soon with UC administrators and PERB, California’s state labor board, in hopes that this can be resolved amicably and our union can be certified. Ultimately, PERB can order a hearing if UC does not drop their objections voluntarily.
"...

____


The San Francisco Examiner
"The willful ignorance and elitism of UC regents"
http://www.sfexaminer.com/willful-ignorance-elitism-uc-regents/

..." research has suggested that these practices are contributing to widening income, racial and gender disparities at UC—and eroding what were once middle class careers for people of color.

For the last two years, AFSCME Local 3299 has made no secret of the fact that rectifying this problem, and rebuilding the career ladders that have been destroyed by UC’s growing reliance on outsourcing was our number one priority.

In 2018 alone, both of our major bargaining units—UC service and patient care technical workers—waged multi-day, statewide strikes over the issue and the inequality it produces. We were joined by unions representing as many as 53,000 of our colleagues. We’ve written letters, called legislators and spoken out at Regents meetings. Students have stood with us in solidarity.

UC’s response has been to bypass collective bargaining and unilaterally impose contract terms on both units—flattening wages, raising health premiums, and refusing to even acknowledge outsourcing.

Through it all, the Regents have turned a blind eye, while rubber stamping a new round of raises for UC’s highest paid administrators. This group of workers already saw their pay rise by 64% between 2005 and 2015.

Meanwhile, tens of thousands of frontline UC workers—custodians, groundskeepers, patient care assistants, Operating Room Techs and others—are struggling to support their families on wages that pay more than 90% less, and in jobs that might well be outsourced tomorrow.

With this as context, the principals of privilege serving on the UC Board of Regents shouldn’t have been surprised to see us on the morning of December 1st. But frankly, we have been surprised by their willful ignorance about a problem that can hardly be considered secret at this point"
...


____
And then they pile on the problems by serving employees more UC PATH alphabet soup regarding their 'benefits', see:

http://uclafacultyassociation.blogspot.com/2018/12/acronym-filled-memo-of-year-award.html


____

In
2019

https://regents.universityofcalifornia.edu/meetings/


January 16-17 - Regents Meeting (UCSF Mission Bay)
February 11 - Health Services Committee
March 13-14 - Regents Meeting (UCLA)
April 9 - Health Services Committee
May 15-16 - Regents Meeting (UCSF Mission Bay)
June 11 - Health Services Committee
July 17-18 - Regents Meeting (UCSF Mission Bay)
August 13 - Health Services Committee
September 18-19 - Regents Meeting (UCLA)
October 10 - Health Services Committee
November 13-14 - Regents Meeting (UCSF Mission Bay)
December 10 - Health Services Committee

Thursday, December 20, 2018

"The renowned UC flagship in Berkeley, on the other hand, has struggled to enroll a student body that reflects the state population. More than half of public schoolchildren in California are Latino, but the share at UC-Berkeley in 2016-2017 was 14 percent. That was 8 points lower than the share at rival UCLA and lower than the other seven undergraduate campuses in the UC system."

See:

Washington Post
"Historic Latino student wave reshapes many colleges. But access is uneven."
https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/historic-latino-student-wave-reshapes-many-colleges-but-access-is-uneven/2018/12/17/86cc113c-c65e-11e8-b1ed-1d2d65b86d0c_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.662e7d4dfadc

"Berkeley is really an outlier in a way that concerns me,” ­UC-Berkeley Chancellor Carol T. Christ said. "...

"Berkeley’s a fabulous university,” Christ said. “But not everybody experiences it that way. If you are a first-generation student, this is a hard place to navigate"

- Just a brief reference to the lack of faculty diversity at the heart of the ongoing UC diversity problems:
...
"Aguilar, a native of Mexico City and a naturalized U.S. citizen, is one of relatively few Latino professors here. A major obstacle to diversifying the faculty is the scarcity of Latino students in doctoral programs.

By the time they get a bachelor’s degree, Aguilar said, many Latinos face economic pressures that drive them away from graduate school. “They need the money now,” he said, adding that parents will often ask them: “So when are you finally going to get a real job?”

In a way, that question shows progress. Census data shows Latino adults are much less likely than others to have any college degree. Schools like UC-Riverside aim to close that gap.

Late one afternoon, thousands of new students gathered on a sun-splashed lawn for fall convocation. Dylan Rodríguez, a media and cultural studies professor, told them that in their diversity, they embodied the university’s public mission.

“You must allow who you are, and where you are from, to form an integral part of why you are here,” he said. When the university opened decades ago, Rodríguez told them, few if any of the faculty or students “looked anything like me or many of you.”...

- historically, has Cal been discriminatory against Latino, Hispanic both during affirmative action allowed periods and during bans on affirmative action?, both periods alike?

_____

Some faculty take on directly the problems as they relate to UC academic senate proceedings and interactions with UCOP , administration.

"In, Of and Out of the UC"
http://utotherescue.blogspot.com/2018/12/in-of-and-out-of-uc.html

..."We felt out of time and place in the almost entirely white space of senior UC Academic Senate leadership, "...
"The feelings of nonbelonging lingered through the evening’s panel and those of the next day. To be clear, we also belonged at the symposium because we are UC faculty and, at the suggestion of one of our senior faculty mentors at UC Merced, were invited to present a talk for the 150th anniversary of the UC Academic Senate based on our perspectives as junior faculty at UC Merced. However, we also felt that we were token faculty of color in the exclusive space of senior Academic Senate leaders. We were not sure if our visible phenotypical presentation of “difference” as faculty from UC Merced was conflated with or would even erase our substantive, intellectual contributions about our experiences of UC Merced as a neoliberal university. Were we there as objects to represent diversity or were we there to speak as subjects of history about the UC system?"...

"
For instance, we are concerned about the market-driven instrumentality of educational priorities that result in the divestment of critical humanities education, critical race and ethnic studies, and globally-informed coursework, including language courses, that speak to the realities of student life stories and non-Western forms of knowledge. We wanted to stimulate serious conversations about how the dilemma of neoliberal development and governance at UCM is shaping the direction of the UC. Indeed, public discourse about UC Merced touts it as the “future of the University of California" based upon the high percentage, 53%, of Latinx students. (UC Berkeley and UCLA have 13% and 21% Latinx student populations respectively.) This is what we mean by "neoliberal diversity" logic" UCM’s development and expansion depends on the visible appearance of Brown and Black bodies on our campus, while its diversity discourses and ideologies undermine more substantive financial investment for the hiring of under-representative Latinx faculty and faculty who specialize in course-work relevant to Latinx students.

Thus, as public funds for higher education dwindle, we wonder, are UCM's struggles indeed the future of the University of California system? How would the Academic Senate address our concerns, and how could we work to re-invigorate the Senate with a new sense of urgency and creativity, working towards collective goals of securing public investment, defending the public mission of the UC system, and committing to hiring faculty of color to help educate the next generation of students of color in the UC system?

We presented our talk on the final panel of the day, and at that point, many important guests at the symposium, including UC system President Janet Napolitano and Provost Michael T. Brown, had already left. We had not pre-circulated our talk, and so the discussants on the panel provided commentary that was independent of the talk. Unfortunately, there was no additional time for a question and answer period, which limited intellectual engagement with the talk's ideas, beyond several questions that came from audience members after the symposium was over for the day.

Our overall sense was that we both visibly represented the abstract notion of “diversity” of the UC system, and also provided “raw material” or “data” about the day-to-day experiences of junior faculty and students of color at UCM. Thus the content of our talk, particularly its critical analysis of neoliberal diversity, was relegated to the margins of the intellectual conversations at the symposium, rather than helping to formulate the constitutive core of conversations by and about the Academic Senate.

In the end, it wasn’t that those in attendance did not understand the concerns we raised. It seemed that they valued our perspective of critical disruption and understood it to be a part of the historical tradition of the UC. Yet the critical substance of our talk was still co-opted into a celebratory narrative about the UC as an institution that values diversity and the public good. The logic of this narrative prioritized the ways in which the UC had successfully fulfilled its mission of administrative and managerial"...
"
We don’t discount the opportunities that UCM has afforded us as tenure-track faculty in a highly precarious job market, or the important ways it has provided and expanded access to higher education for undergraduate students from California. However, we continue to worry about the quality of that educational access. We are worried about high lecturer to tenure-track faculty ratios. For example, in Fall 2018, the proportion of contingent to ladder-rank UCM faculty was 143 to 249, meaning that over 1/3rd of the UCM faculty are off the tenure track.

We are worried too about over-worked faculty and staff, and the lack of additional tutoring and mentoring services for first-generation, poor and working students. We are worried about insufficient numbers of critical humanities course offerings, and of faculty of color who can serve as mentors for the students who take them. "Trickle-down economics” had revealed to us the ways in which ideological and increasingly fictive notions of the universalized public university and its liberal-humanistic imperatives mask late liberal capitalist university development and its negative ramifications for its racialized and gendered subjects.

In the end, we left the conference reeling from the burdensome weight of the universalist, liberal-humanist tradition of the University of California
"...

Some of the origin/perpetuation of the problems creating this came up in September UC regents' meeting as a question from regent Elliott and in other committee board conversation during that week of meetings e.g. regent Perez, others see one of the last items mentioned here.:
https://cloudminder.blogspot.com/2018/09/uc-student-regent-details-concerns-over.html

-- the issue of Chancellor Leland's understanding of what UCM's role in resident CA admissions practices on behalf of UC, to assuage or buffer the higher nombers of non resident admissions at UC Berkeley, UCLA , UCD, Etc also is something to think about in tandem with the above issues raised.

And what are the numbers at UCSF, other non UC undergrad populations-even if it isn't undergrad- why avoid discussion of it if it's ok, acceptable as UC planning objectives?


___
Then, on this other set of issues:

The untenable inconsistent practices UC wants to employ?:

https://uclafacultyassociation.blogspot.com/2018/12/open-vs-closed-part-2_20.html

Thursday, December 13, 2018

Just UCSB? - Admissions Decisions Creating ? And other things.

See:

"Faculty fret about cheating and low English skills as UC Santa Barbara enrolls more students from China"
https://www.latimes.com/local/education/la-me-edu-uc-santa-barbara-chinese-students-20181213-story.html


Includes:
..."the blame on the university for failing to fully prepare for what has been a rapid influx of Chinese students. He and other faculty said they have pressed in recent years for international students to be better screened for English-language skills, offered more remedial help and instructed in American university norms, including the importance of academic integrity and respectful classroom behavior."...

"A few years ago, UC Santa Barbara faculty were told at a meeting that Chinese students made up 6% of the student body but accounted for one-third of plagiarism cases, according to Paul Spickard, a history professor on the faculty admissions committee."...

____

There's this on : http://www.dailycal.org/2018/12/12/student-regent-devon-graves-to-chair-uc-board-of-regents-basic-needs-committee/

Remember earlier:

https://cloudminder.blogspot.com/2018/09/uc-student-regent-details-concerns-over.html

____

And on Title IX:
https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2018/12/13/state-law-likely-conflicts-devoss-title-ix-proposal







Monday, December 10, 2018

The political moves of UC Regents in relation to Title IX hypocrisy or pension reforms etc; UC Regents Special Meeting added tomorrow; Cal's new words on diversity and undergrad admissions; more UC PATH problems

See:
"UCPath representatives respond to unresolved payroll complications at town hall" https://dailybruin.com/2018/12/09/ucpath-representatives-respond-to-unresolved-payroll-complications-at-town-hall/
Includes:
..."Viorato added she thinks UCLA failed to support students who are most vulnerable to extreme financial instability.

“The university needs to determine how it will offer reparations to students who have faced eviction, had to take out high-interest loan offers and build their credit card debt,” she said.

The town hall included a Q&A session that allowed students to directly ask UCPath representatives questions. Claire Fieldman, USAC president, and Jamie Kennerk, USAC’s external vice president, were among the undergraduate and graduate students who voiced concerns.

The representatives at the town hall said there was no policy in place that would close unresolved cases in four days. However, Kennerk said this conflicted with information she had received from program directors and the UCLA UCPath team.

“So now that I’m hearing that that’s not how it works, I’m confused, and I think that we all need more light spread on what the actual case system looks like,” Kennerk said.

Kennerk added that solving the current payroll problems has been challenging because the new system is decentralized.

“UCPath doesn’t directly control everything,” she said in a separate interview. “It’s been hard to hold people directly accountable, which has complicated both student advocacy as well as UCPath’s ability to triage issues.”

Several of those in attendance asked what UCPath will do to help student workers who have explored all available resources but still cannot resolve their payroll and financial issues.

A UCPath representative said UCPath did not anticipate the issues student workers are experiencing and will adjust by providing better customer service.

The representatives’ presentation said students can receive loans from University Credit Union, Student Loan Services and Collections, and UCLA Graduate Division.

However, David Tuyo, a University Credit Union representative, said there is a cap on the amount students can receive if they opt for a short-term loan. UCU increased the maximum loan amount from $350 to $500 in light of student workers reporting payroll issues, but Tuyo said he thinks this is still not enough for many students.

“We don’t have a giant pot of money,” Tuyo said. “My heart goes out to those who need more than the $500 cap on short-term loans.”

Yunyi Li, the UCLA campus chair for UAW Local 2864 union, said UC Riverside and UC Merced, which implemented UCPath in January, experienced similar issues with the new system.

Li said the town hall provided useful but redundant information and added she thought UCLA acted in negligence by failing to resolve issues with UCPath before implementing the system at UCLA and treating the problems as an issue of customer service.

Anais Lopez, a third-year political science student, said she skipped a class to attend the town hall.

“Thursday of 10th week is very inconvenient for most students. It’s almost asking students not to go in a way,” Lopez said. “Although we want our money, we also need to get our grades, and we need to go to office hours and talk to our TAs and go to classes.”

Li and Lopez both said they were concerned about the number of students who work two jobs but have only received paychecks for one since the implementation of UCPath.

Lopez added students who work two jobs did not experience pay issues with the previous payroll system.

UCPath and CRU representatives said they were interested in hosting future information sessions, but stated they have yet to schedule another one. The UC Office of the President said in an email statement that additional staff and resources for troubleshooting UCPath issues will remain available at UCLA until the end of the academic year."


And :

"UC employees report paycheck errors with implementation of new payroll system"
http://www.dailycal.org/2018/12/06/uc-employees-report-paycheck-errors-with-new-payroll-system/


-- but neither article tackles the $750 million dollar project costs thus far and its effect on future campus budgets, tuition and fees...
See also:
http://cloudminder.blogspot.com/2018/12/uc-regents-meeting-december-11th-uc.html


____

This new UC Regent making this move:

Los Angeles Times
"Labor leader Laphonza Butler jumps to political consulting — and just maybe a Kamala Harris presidential campaign"
https://www.latimes.com/politics/la-pol-ca-laphonza-butler-20181207-story.html
Includes:
..."Butler will be a partner in the newly rechristened firm SCRB Strategies, along with veteran strategists Ace Smith, Sean Clegg and Juan Rodriguez. Their clients include Newsom, Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf and Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.), a frequent subject of speculation in her own right about 2020 presidential ambitions."..."“Can you imagine if we have a President Kamala Harris, what that would mean for Laphonza Butler?” Mitchell asked."...

--can we imagine what that means: potential worries, pitfalls for UC regents practices, policies, interactions?

Can we recall Harris' approach on Title IX in CA and specifically UC - the committee of two MOU moves, remember?
https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2015/05/129131/napolitano-harris-announce-collaboration-sexual-assault-prevention-and-response


Or, its policy relationship to these recent widely covered troubling developments that extends over several years:

At minimum, Kamala "Harris should’ve known key staff member was accused of harassment
Fresno Bee"
https://www.fresnobee.com/opinion/editorials/article222813470.html


Sac Bee broke it - then everyone else covered it:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/longtime-aide-to-sen-kamala-d-harris-resigns-amid-sexual-harassment-allegations/2018/12/06/b748934c-f94b-11e8-8c9a-860ce2a8148f_story.html?utm_term=.be0fbe3739c1p

- forcing non-disclosure agreement NDA and a "no rehire" clause included in the details of the settlement agreement

The case, as an internal HR case, extended over year+ before her departure mid-term to go to US Senate, yet:
"‘Nope.’ Kamala Harris denies knowing of allegations, settlement involving longtime aide" https://www.mcclatchydc.com/latest-news/article222727270.html
..."she introduced a bill in June to ban forced nondisclosure agreements in harassment settlements."...

__
And no coverage of new UC regent Cohen's position on high stakes CA rule, CA supreme court case on pensions, anywhere... - even though his job makes him a major figure in all of it- and the president of the UC regents, who appointed him regent, also has a detailed view on the subject.
____

At Cal

Talk is cheap model again?:
https://news.berkeley.edu/2018/12/07/campus-announces-the-undergraduate-student-diversity-project/


..."On December 12 at noon in the Pauley Ballroom, I will be joined by Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor Paul Alivisatos for the last of this semester’s “Campus Conversations.” While we will, as always, be ready to field a broad range of questions, we hope to focus this particular conversation on our quest for a diverse campus community and culture that will help safeguard and sustain our excellence in teaching, research and public service for many years to come. This event is just the first in a series of opportunities to pose hard questions about our values, plans and commitments, to share innovative ideas and to challenge the status quo — to do, in short, what Berkeley does best.

Sincerely,

Carol T. Christ
Chancellor"

-- She is already having great difficulty in exhibiting good optics on the issue within her cabinet- a non existent diverse Chancellor's cabinet comprised of the most senior administration positions. So, how can she show results, fixes to long term admissions problems with diversity of undergrad student admissions? The students will not see similar faces in the most senior positions in administration at California hall...is that the experience Cal wants to give those students? Or, does the Chancellor and her ilk think the students will not notice?

________


There are now additional "special meeting " agenda items added to the UC Regents Health Committee meeting tomorrow, mostly centered around actions increasing the compensation for senior management:

https://regents.universityofcalifornia.edu/meetings/agendas/dec11.html

December 11, 2018


You can watch it here:

https://regents.universityofcalifornia.edu/meetings/videos/dec18/dec18.html









See also:
http://cloudminder.blogspot.com/2018/12/uc-regents-meeting-december-11th-uc.html


____
And, yes Elsevier:

http://uclafacultyassociation.blogspot.com/2018/12/open-vs-closed.html

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

UC Regents Meeting December 11th , UC PATH coverage,, more

See:
"Faulty payroll system leaves hundreds of University of California employees without checks"

https://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/the-state-worker/article222468555.html

--strangely, the piece claims UC could not provide accurate total numbers for those employees affected at UC Riverside nor UC Merced - which is very strange since northern UC is supposed to be supported on UC PATH by UC Merced and southern UC is supposed to be supported on UC PATH by UC Riverside- yet the support centers can't provide accurate numbers about their own home campuses where they are?! The assoc vp operations and project manager said he could not provide the info...

"He said he didn’t have numbers for Merced or Riverside."

And,
"About 77,000 UC system employees — including both staff and student positions — are covered by UCPath, according to UC Associate Vice President of Operations Mark Cianca.

That’s about one third of the system’s 230,000 employees. The remainder are expected to be covered by UC Path by the end of 2019."

-and in the presentation to UC Regents in November it was made clear that some UC labs are now added in and UC is using UC Path as "a selling point" to them and others in contracts,grants etc. So there's that...

____


UC Regents Health Services December 11th meeting:


https://regents.universityofcalifornia.edu/regmeet/dec18/hs.pdf


Public Comment Period
Action: Approval of the Minutes of the Meeting of October 9, 2018

H2: Discussion Remarks of the Executive Vice President – UC Health

H3: Action Approval of Appointment of and Compensation for Chief Operating Officer, UC Irvine Health System, Irvine Campus as Discussed in Closed Session

H4: Discussion Working Together: Conduct Expectations in Healthcare Settings and Initiatives to Prevent and Address Disruptive Behavior

H5: Discussion UC San Diego Health Affiliation with El Centro Regional Medical Center: Impact on Quality and Branding, San Diego Campus

H6: Discussion Perspectives on the Role of Network Expansion in Supporting the University’s Academic Mission and Affiliation Principles

H7: Action Amendment of Regents Policy 3401 – Policy on Student Health and Counseling Centers

H8: Action UC Health Capital Financial Plan

Could H4 item have anything to do with this that came out yesterday?:
"UC Irvine Employee Files Lawsuit Alleging University Disregarded Sexual Harassment Claims" https://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2018/12/03/uc-irvine-sexual-harassment-lawsuit/

It is the latest to follow on the heels of , from Sept:

"Former UC Irvine vice chancellor committed sex discrimination by paying women less than men, review finds"
https://www.latimes.com/local/education/la-me-edu-uc-irvine-pay-inequity-20180907-story.html


Another round of revolving door between UC and CSU:
"A former UC Irvine vice chancellor touted for promoting equity and diversity committed sex discrimination by paying three women less than men who did the same or similar work, a campus review has found.

Thomas A. Parham left his post as vice chancellor of student affairs in June to become president of Cal State Dominguez Hills. The review, which was obtained by The Times, found that Parham violated university nondiscrimination policies by refusing to pay an assistant vice chancellor and the directors of two campus centers as much as male counterparts."


And then there was this:
https://www.latimes.com/local/education/la-me-edu-uc-irvine-sexual-misconduct-20181013-story.html


Add in here- this which appears as an opinion piece at WaPo rather than a statement from UCOP:
"
Washington Post
Janet Napolitano: Don’t let the Trump administration undermine Title IX"
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/janet-napolitano-dont-let-the-trump-administration-undermine-title-ix/2018/12/04/6c91f316-f7fc-11e8-863c-9e2f864d47e7_story.html?utm_term=.02363c4f054a

The Washington Post
Opinions
Janet Napolitano: Don’t let the Trump administration undermine Title IX

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos speaks at a student town hall in Philadelphia on Sept. 17. (Matt Rourke/AP)

By Janet Napolitano
December 4 at 4:54 PM
Janet Napolitano, secretary of homeland security from 2009 to 2013, is president of the University of California.

The Education Department, in issuing its proposed Title IX regulations, appears to believe our nation’s colleges and universities have gone too far in responding to allegations of sexual harassment and sexual violence.

The department is mistaken.

Twenty-seven years ago, I was part of the legal team that supported Anita Hill as she testified before members of a Senate panel, most of whom had never grappled with the concept of sexual harassment before. Today, we understand better how sexual harassment can devastate the educations, careers and lives of those subjected to it. In higher education, this awakening, in large part, is because of students who courageously and publicly shared their own experiences, drawing the attention of not only their college administrators but also the Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights — then under the Obama administration — and the nation at large. This, in turn, has led to critical improvements in how schools respond to complaints.



As a university president, I know all too well how crucial it is — and how complex it can be — to quickly and appropriately respond to sexual harassment and sexual violence. Since I came to lead the University of California in 2014, the UC system has dedicated significant time, tangible resources and its best thinking to develop processes that are fair to those accused and to those bringing complaints. Many other schools did the same, and as these processes continue to evolve on campuses and in the courts, we remain steadfast in our commitment to ensure fair and equitable outcomes for all parties. We have made important progress and, as a result, have seen a significant increase in reporting. This is important because it means people feel more confident about coming forward and are able to access the resources and recourse available to them.

The Education Department’s proposed rules threaten to reverse this hard-won progress by unraveling critical protections for individuals who are sexually harassed and undermining the very procedures designed to ensure fairness and justice. For example, these new rules would require that schools allow representatives of the accused — often lawyers — to cross-examine complainants at live hearings. This is an intimidating prospect, especially to students wrestling with the already difficult decision to come forward. This will discourage reporting, and it is unnecessary. While this requirement is supposedly intended to protect the accused, many universities, including UC, already permit the accused to question the complainant and witnesses through a neutral intermediary in a manner that does not cause further harm.

The Education Department would also narrow the definition of sexual harassment. The department currently recognizes that there is a spectrum of misconduct and requires schools to stop and remedy only behavior sufficiently serious to limit the target’s educational opportunities. This standard has worked well both for schools and for the Education Department through several administrations and does not need to be fixed. The new, narrower definition risks leaving serious conduct unaddressed — especially at schools that adopt a higher evidentiary standard, which the proposed rules also allow.


Additionally, the proposed rules would significantly diminish schools’ responsibilities to respond to complaints. Schools would be required to investigate only formal complaints that are made to someone with specific authority to institute corrective measures and that allege misconduct within a university program or activity. Worse, schools need only respond in a manner that is not “deliberately indifferent.” I believe our responsibilities as administrators and educators extend beyond these woefully minimal standards, and UC will not reduce protections for its own community members. I am concerned, however, about the safety and well-being of individuals at institutions that take a different approach.

These changes also would weaken the authority of the Office for Civil Rights, meaning the federal government would play little role in ensuring students received important Title IX protections. Schools look to the Education Department for leadership on critical issues affecting our nation’s students. Yet these proposed rules suggest that the Trump administration has deprioritized combating sexual harassment and sexual violence. Under the guise of providing due process, they represent yet another effort to erode important civil rights protections.

The problems of sexual harassment and sexual violence won’t go away until we work together to make them go away and change the culture of what is acceptable behavior. In the face of efforts to set this important work back, colleges and universities cannot waver in their commitment to do what is right. For too long, our culture has blamed and stigmatized survivors and allowed sexual misconduct without accountability. Together, we can build on progress we have already made to change that. We can, and we must."

____

Then this latest at Cal:

https://news.berkeley.edu/2018/12/03/settlement-reached-in-free-speech-case/

http://www.dailycal.org/2018/12/04/uc-berkeley-event-policy-revisions-to-have-minimal-effect-on-campus-administration-says/


Then check out headline spin on it...

____


On students basic needs and separately the topic of IX there's:

https://matteroffact.tv/nearly-half-of-u-s-college-students-dont-get-enough-to-eat/


https://matteroffact.tv/title-ix-balance-protect-victims-accused/


https://matteroffact.tv/less-third-sexual-harassment-victims-report-boss-hr/